Televisa

Latin American News Media: Who Is Big on Facebook?

Today, we released the Facebook Index Latin America, which ranks news media platforms from Latin America based on the number of Facebook followers compared to the size of their market.
 

Central America, Still Lagging Behind

In spite of high inequality and rampant poverty, which further contributed to the widening digital divide in Latin America, the internet has experienced accelerated growth. Some 55% of the inhabitants of Latin America used internet in 2015, according to the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), a UN agency.
 

Media Owners in Chile and Colombia Have a Hand in Many Pies

A handful of groups control media in Chile and Colombia. Their businesses extend much further into a spate of industries ranging from banking to retail to food manufacturing. A Chilean NGO sheds light on influence and power in two major Latin American markets

Despite the emergence of a new wave of journalistic initiatives, ownership of media industry in Chile and Colombia is highly concentrated and often lacks transparency, according to Media Map, a new report from Poderopedia slated to be launched in mid-December 2015. Poderopedia is a Chile-registered NGO set up in 2012 that specializes in exposing structures of power and influence in Latin American countries. 

Right of Reply Law in Mexico: Against Citizens, in Favor of Media Moguls

A new law on the right of reply was adopted last month in Mexico after it had hibernated for eight years in the Congress. But hopes that this act would empower citizens were shattered as the “reply process” put forward by this law is likely to be lengthy, legally convoluted and fully under the control of powerful media corporations.

The procedure for exercising the right of reply in the approved law was shaped by the dominant television groups that have consistently lobbied for retaining the power to decide whether or not to rectify facts disseminated in their shows, newscasts or other programs. They won this game and retained their power. This is why many experts and journalists say that the right of reply law favors the interests of mighty media groups (many of them close to political groups) instead of those of the citizens.

So, what does it take for an ordinary Mexican to reply to what they find false or offensive in the media? The answer is a large quantity of both time and, invariably, headaches.