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The Anti-Orban Revolution Won’t Be Televised

Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orban has been quietly gaining control over a media empire, especially TV assets, with the help of oligarchs fighting to win government contracts; but ahead of general elections set for 2018, the ongoing war between him and former ally media mogul Lajos Simicska threatens to bring the fascist Jobbik party to power – and squash independent media.
 
Lajos Simicska, one of Hungary’s wealthiest media and construction moguls, is said to be in the cards to buy the online news server Index.hu. In the past several months, Mr Simicska has been frantically restructuring his media empire, shedding some outlets and shopping around for new ones.
 
The reason? Mr Simicska is hell-bent to skunk Hungary’s prime minister Viktor Orban in the national elections scheduled to take place in 2018. He knows that having an arsenal of strong news media can make it happen.
 

America’s Advertising Agencies Funnel Ad Cash to Their Own Media

Ad agencies in America have been increasingly buying stock in media companies to secure slots for their clients’ ads. Nothing would be wrong with that if they remembered one thing: to tell their clients, the advertisers, what they actually own.
 
Back in the old days, the advertising sales unit and the newsroom in major independent newspapers were two separate departments. Sometimes people in the two parts of the newspaper wouldn’t even be allowed to meet. The idea was to insulate the newsroom from the pressures of some advertising agencies who wanted inches of flattering coverage in exchange for spending ad dollars in the newspaper. The ultimate goal was to secure independent reporting.
 
Those days are gone. Advertisers, ad agencies and media companies collude more than ever these days.